the Times, Téa Braun, chief executive of the Human Dignity Trust, a campaign group based in London, welcomed the ban in Antigua.‘After almost 150 years on the statute books, devastating countless LGBT lives in their wake, these colonial legacy laws have finally found their rightful place in the history books,’ she said.Brits could be asked to turn down thermostat and eat later to avoid winter blackoutsGirl, 19, who waited year to see doctor dies ‘within weeks’ of cancer diagnosisMum and daughter, 7, sexually assaulted on walk home from schoolTéa described the court’s decision as ‘a pivotal victory for LGBT people in Antigua and Barbuda’.Handing down her ruling, High Court Judge Marissa Robertson said that ‘the Constitution is often described as a living instrument which gives significant room for the realization and enjoyment of individuals’ human rights. ‘The very rights that the document espouses and protects are capable of evolution since concepts, attitudes and the understanding of human rights and dignity evolve over time.’It has not been clear if the attorney general for Antigua and Barbuda planned to appeal the decision.